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TORSO.GENERATING SPACE CD-R (NEXIALIST)

Image of TORSO.GENERATING SPACE CD-R (NEXIALIST)

$4.00 - On Sale

HALFORGANIC SAID:

Torso was a Nexialist project aimed at creating the audible phenomena of space, a reversive engineering of spatial sound. 16 tracks were collected for the "Generating Space" album. It features a red colored CD-R with red on-disc print in an edition of 100, in a plastpak with sticker attached. It is now completely sold out. The sticker blurb stated: "Artificial and impossible spaces are made possible through torso's processing of spatial audio phenomena! Ethereal noise and digital density create explorations into sonic architecture." Dead Angel Zine concluded: "(…) minimalism is the key here: the efx themselves are used in minimalist fashion, although at times there are several going on at once and it gets pretty dense. The noise generated by such experimental sound processing, especially with the use of distortion and delay, is often gritty and booming, the sound of disturbed things happening in vast open rooms. It's the sound of machinery left to run in empty rooms, a cold and formless sound that implies the absence of humans to control the vibrations. There are moments when the rumble nearly drowns out the rest of the sounds, but then it recedes to reveal much that was previously hidden - a practice of playing hide 'n seek with great shapes of sound. There's a heavy drone quotient at work in places. Tnteresting work of a loud and dark ambient nature." A review from DCFE: "(…) the musician is doing an extension of avant-garde classical music especially of Pierre Schaeffer, Stockhausen and ambience music from Brian Eno. What's interesting about this CD is that the musician approached musique concrete from a different approach to Pierre Schaeffer in late 1940s. Pierre Schaeffer recorded live sound recordings and then manipulates such live sounds electronically using tapes. The musician here did the reverse. He used electronic instruments to imitate live sounds recordings. I could hear the sound of tanks battles, chilling sound in dark tunnel, TV set when all channels closed down, but all these with a sense of roughness in sound." And finally, IBOL magazine: "What an evil trick! Someone took an unsuspecting minimalist, plugged him into a Marshall stack and recorded it on their hard-drive. Or at least that is what Torso makes me think of. There are almost no discernible "source sounds" in this recording, only (apparently) digital manipulation. An extremely crisp, distilled and singular vision of music, these 16 tracks are layed out in 3 larger groupings, for a total of 67 minutes of noise. Most of the textures are fairly harsh, but the presentation is more ambient (ubiquitous, surrounding)."